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Last night at the New Years party another car guy and I had been talking about various topics relating to cars. He brought up something I found to be pretty interesting or worthy to post up in a new thread here :hehehe:

He spoke about using a quart of transmission fluid with your oil. Check your your oil on quick intervals, when it turns dark you change it. The idea is that when your can get close to 1000 miles before the oil darkens your motor is clean?

Any truth to this?
 

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Last night at the New Years party another car guy and I had been talking about various topics relating to cars. He brought up something I found to be pretty interesting or worthy to post up in a new thread here :hehehe:

He spoke about using a quart of transmission fluid with your oil. Check your your oil on quick intervals, when it turns dark you change it. The idea is that when your can get close to 1000 miles before the oil darkens your motor is clean?

Any truth to this?
ATF is a high detergent oil. In older engines a Quart would help disolve sludge and often free up a noisy lifter. I wouldn't do this on a newer Corvette any more.These engines run a lot cleaner and changing oil is all they need. But it did work years ago.:thumbsup3::thumbsup3:
 

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I have never heard such a thing. I'd stick to known products for that sort of purpose. Sea foam
 

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Apparently it is not a new trick by any means. I've read this type of thing before and some post (state) that they have had good luck with this type of service. The problem (risk) that I always see with any of these types of additions (ATF, Marvels Mystery Oil, Seafoam, etc.) to the oil is that first, you are thinning and changing the chemistry of your oil. Second, you are affecting the lubricity of your oil. Third, why this works is because all of these types of additives have solvents in them to varying degrees which serve to dislodge carbon and other built up contaminants. What they generally don't do however is dissolve these deposits, they simply cause them to break free. If any of them are sized just right you can and will now have a lot of small abbrasive particulate matter floating and bouncing around inside your engine that may or may not get captured and removed during your next oil change (whatever interval you choose.)

Hmm....

Paul

p.s. Automotive Engineers use ATF in motors that they want to accelerate the wear rate on for testing purposes. In other words they fill it exclusively with ATF and no oil and run the motors to see the effects of long term wear and damage over shorter durations then would be practical for development timelines.
 

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Last night at the New Years party another car guy and I had been talking about various topics relating to cars. He brought up something I found to be pretty interesting or worthy to post up in a new thread here :hehehe:

He spoke about using a quart of transmission fluid with your oil. Check your your oil on quick intervals, when it turns dark you change it. The idea is that when your can get close to 1000 miles before the oil darkens your motor is clean?

Any truth to this?
I get over 5000 miles before the oil begins to darken just by using my normal oil and changing it at recommended intervals. Sounds like a tip left over from the 40's (or earlier).
 

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I've heard of people doing this on older cars. As pointed out already I wouldn't do this on a newer Corvette or any sports car for that matter.
 

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Apparently it is not a new trick by any means. I've read this type of thing before and some post (state) that they have had good luck with this type of service. The problem (risk) that I always see with any of these types of additions (ATF, Marvels Mystery Oil, Seafoam, etc.) to the oil is that first, you are thinning and changing the chemistry of your oil. Second, you are affecting the lubricity of your oil. Third, why this works is because all of these types of additives have solvents in them to varying degrees which serve to dislodge carbon and other built up contaminants. What they generally don't do however is dissolve these deposits, they simply cause them to break free. If any of them are sized just right you can and will now have a lot of small abbrasive particulate matter floating and bouncing around inside your engine that may or may not get captured and removed during your next oil change (whatever interval you choose.)

Hmm....

Paul

p.s. Automotive Engineers use ATF in motors that they want to accelerate the wear rate on for testing purposes. In other words they fill it exclusively with ATF and no oil and run the motors to see the effects of long term wear and damage over shorter durations then would be practical for development timelines.
Talon, reading your response reminded me of a guy I worked for in California that ran his 1956 Buick from day one with ATF for oil. I was a kid 18 years old and Old Buick had over 100,000 miles and still did not smoke or really use oil.
I would have liked to see what inside of that engine looked like.:coffeetime::coffeetime:
 

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I guess Toobroketoretire hasn't seen this, but yes, it's true, ATF is a very good cleaner. You don't drive on it, only idle. It will clean the inside of the engine pretty good. It also works well to decarbon the intake track, but becareful because it will kill your cats if they get saturated.

The was this little known engine builder, tinkerer by the name of Smokey Yunick who would tell'ya he had the "Best Damn Garage in Town" aptly named Smokey's Automotive Service. He used ATF to lube the cylinder walls and piston assemblies prior to knocking them in the holes. His contention was that it allowed the rings to seat quicker and wouldn't glaze the walls like oil would.
 

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i too have heard of it,as a short use clean out but since the devepement of multigrade oils and now the even better synthetics, i don t see where it would be necessary unless you never change your oil regular changes especially with synthetics, will keep any sludge to a minimum neglect is the main cause of sludge
 

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Smokey Yunick

I guess Toobroketoretire hasn't seen this, but yes, it's true, ATF is a very good cleaner. You don't drive on it, only idle. It will clean the inside of the engine pretty good. It also works well to decarbon the intake track, but becareful because it will kill your cats if they get saturated.

The was this little known engine builder, tinkerer by the name of Smokey Yunick who would tell'ya he had the "Best Damn Garage in Town" aptly named Smokey's Automotive Service. He used ATF to lube the cylinder walls and piston assemblies prior to knocking them in the holes. His contention was that it allowed the rings to seat quicker and wouldn't glaze the walls like oil would.
http://www.smokeyyunick.com/PressReleases/Biography.pdf

Also,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smokey_Yunick
 

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I guess Toobroketoretire hasn't seen this, but yes, it's true, ATF is a very good cleaner. You don't drive on it, only idle. It will clean the inside of the engine pretty good. It also works well to decarbon the intake track, but becareful because it will kill your cats if they get saturated.

The was this little known engine builder, tinkerer by the name of Smokey Yunick who would tell'ya he had the "Best Damn Garage in Town" aptly named Smokey's Automotive Service. He used ATF to lube the cylinder walls and piston assemblies prior to knocking them in the holes. His contention was that it allowed the rings to seat quicker and wouldn't glaze the walls like oil would.
I still have Smokey's book and I still use it on pistons when putting engines together.:thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

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A good friend of mine 40 years ago tried this. It loosened up all the carbon and sludge in his engine. His engine smoked really bad after that. The good news: his dad bought him a new car. The bad news: it was a mustang. You better know what you're doing before you do this.
 

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I've heard of this before, but transmission fluid will be horrible for the engine. I'd stick with products specifically made for that.
 
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