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Discussion Starter #1
Hi folks!!
I am still relatively new to the corvette world, as I have owned my 1980 vette for about a month and a half now, but even in this limited amount of time, I have come to the following conclusion:

There are two kinds of c3 corvette owners: Those who have replaced trailing arms, and those who haven't.

Had a rear wheel bearing starting to howl at me, figured it needed to be replaced. Did some research, and found that replacing the wheel bearing itself was a giant hassle requiring special tools and such, so I figured the best thing to do was to just replace the whole trailing arm assembly. Did some more research. Found that replacing trailing arms was also a giant hassle, but doesn't need so much in the way of special tools, and besides, once you are done, a major portion of rear suspension is new, and ya don't have to worry about it for awhile. So I jumped in with both feet. Ordered the trailing arms, and when they showed up, I got started. The undercarriage of my car is relatively rust-free, and in pretty good shape in general, so I thought I wouldn't have to much trouble. I was wrong. First problem: The lower shock mounts refused to budge. Had to cut 'em off with a sawzall, and order new ones. Second problem: Trailing arm bushing bolts didn't wanna budge. took a sawzall to 'em, and ordered new ones. The reassembly went alot better. Still have to get to the alignment shop, and that should be that.
Now, for all you folks contemplating a trailing arm job, listen to me, and take my advice: Before you even get started, make sure you have the following items: A big sawzall(not battery powered, one that plugs into an outlet, and has some cajones), new trailing arm bushing bolts AND new stainless steel shim kit, as you probably won't be able to reuse the old ones. New lower shock mounts, along with the bushing that goes with it for the camber arm, and consider replacing the u-joints while you have it apart, they are cheap, and ya might just as well do it now. Ya might wanna take a week off from work, too, and stock up on your favorite beer.Ohh, one last thing, don't beat on the lower shock mount to hard while trying to get it out, as the two little ears that come off of the bottom of the trailing arm are made of cast iron, and are brittle. If you break off one of these ears, there goes yer core-charge, dude! Learned that one the hard way.As always, the preceding is just my humble opinion, and your mileage may vary! Peace out, y'all!

Scott
 

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Sounds like you had more fun than any human should be allowed to have, in one spot. Anyway, you have convinced me to save my money, and hire a professional; my wife doesn't like it when I get cranky, and from your description of the job, I WILL get cranky! Thanks for the warning!
 

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Yeah, unless you are a REAL cheapskate, (like me...) Ya might be better off having someone else do it. It's a bitch. If anybody out there has a real easy time getting trailing arms off of a c3 'vette, don't come on this forum and brag about it, for your own good. Probably be at least a hundred guys who will track ya down and hurt ya bad!!!! :smack:

To Moderator: I'm just kidding around, don't get all exited, sheesh!!:thumbsup:

Scott
 

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The Lesson To Be Learned Is...

5--8-08...

THERE AIN'T NO EASY WAY OUT,i.e. Tell That To Most Young Kids Who Rich $ Daddy Just Bought Old 60/70's Corvette For...

Etal: Had Young Kid E Mail Me He Sold His 69 Corvette Rich $$ Daddy Bought Because It Would Not Stop Fouling Spark Plugs--Big Block 427,396 Fouled Spark Plugs When Then It Was Real Gasoline...

Now It's Corn Fed Cheap 81 Octane GASOLINA...

PHOTO 2ND NEW OVERBORE (2002) ENGINE: Ignition Problems, Defective Parts=Carburetor,Electric Fuel Pump, M S D Coils,850cc Batteries,etc. NOW: 12.0:1 Compression, Square Port Heads,L88 Cam + Hi Po Other= 5 Years Later It Runs On Cheap 81 Octane Corn Fed Union 76 Gas...

NOTE: Check My Photos File -No Show Thumbnail!???

MeanMotherUSA
 

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I Know What You Mean About The Trailing Arms. I Checked Mine Out Then Ordered The 2 In. Offset Ones And Took It To The Local Vette Shop. No Bruised Knuckles Or Ego Lol
 

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Hello all
I do this every day for a living and have been for 21 years (Corvettes only) if any one needs help please feel free to email me and i can tell you the easiest way to do these kind on things. There are lots of short cut that make one week job for you in to a weekend job.
David Steele
 

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Hi folks!!
I am still relatively new to the corvette world, as I have owned my 1980 vette for about a month and a half now, but even in this limited amount of time, I have come to the following conclusion:

There are two kinds of c3 corvette owners: Those who have replaced trailing arms, and those who haven't.

Had a rear wheel bearing starting to howl at me, figured it needed to be replaced. Did some research, and found that replacing the wheel bearing itself was a giant hassle requiring special tools and such, so I figured the best thing to do was to just replace the whole trailing arm assembly. Did some more research. Found that replacing trailing arms was also a giant hassle, but doesn't need so much in the way of special tools, and besides, once you are done, a major portion of rear suspension is new, and ya don't have to worry about it for awhile. So I jumped in with both feet. Ordered the trailing arms, and when they showed up, I got started. The undercarriage of my car is relatively rust-free, and in pretty good shape in general, so I thought I wouldn't have to much trouble. I was wrong. First problem: The lower shock mounts refused to budge. Had to cut 'em off with a sawzall, and order new ones. Second problem: Trailing arm bushing bolts didn't wanna budge. took a sawzall to 'em, and ordered new ones. The reassembly went alot better. Still have to get to the alignment shop, and that should be that.
Now, for all you folks contemplating a trailing arm job, listen to me, and take my advice: Before you even get started, make sure you have the following items: A big sawzall(not battery powered, one that plugs into an outlet, and has some cajones), new trailing arm bushing bolts AND new stainless steel shim kit, as you probably won't be able to reuse the old ones. New lower shock mounts, along with the bushing that goes with it for the camber arm, and consider replacing the u-joints while you have it apart, they are cheap, and ya might just as well do it now. Ya might wanna take a week off from work, too, and stock up on your favorite beer.Ohh, one last thing, don't beat on the lower shock mount to hard while trying to get it out, as the two little ears that come off of the bottom of the trailing arm are made of cast iron, and are brittle. If you break off one of these ears, there goes yer core-charge, dude! Learned that one the hard way.As always, the preceding is just my humble opinion, and your mileage may vary! Peace out, y'all!

Scott
I’m in the middle of a complete restoration of a 1968 L-88 coupe. I just got through building the complete trailing arms myself and the way people talked on here, I mean no disrespect to anyone, I was wondering what the worry and concern is all about. You tube videos help a lot, without them it would have been tougher to understand. I bought all the special tools and made a few myself. This was a very easy job compared to what I thought was going to be involved.It helps that I’m a tech and have been for over 30 years but this was my first rear end suspension build on a corvette. I’ve always enjoyed doing everything myself. The advice I can give someone doing this job is A: the tools are not all that expensive B: if you plan on keeping this car then it will not be the last time you will be in there, so the tools are worth keeping. C:this is not that hard of a job, you have people here and you tube to help. Jonseys garage the showed me how to make a press so you can press the spindle out. Cost me less than 10 $ to make( scavenged a lot of parts. Feel free to ask me any questions and I’ll see if I can help.
Mshawn
 
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