Chevy Corvette Forum banner

1 - 18 of 18 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I dont know were this belongs off topic or tech
I bought my first torque wrench! but after owning it I want to use it, but what do!?
torque the lugnuts?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
836 Posts
Torque Wrench

I dont know were this belongs off topic or tech
I bought my first torque wrench! but after owning it I want to use it, but what do!?
torque the lugnuts?
Yeah! U can Do That ! LOL! On Small Nuts & Bolts U Have To Have the Feel !!! On Tighting...Too Much, & U'll Strip or Break the Bolt! & Too Loose & It'll unsrew itself ! Does That Help ?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,695 Posts
I dont know were this belongs off topic or tech
I bought my first torque wrench! but after owning it I want to use it, but what do!?
torque the lugnuts?

As far as I know all of the C3's 7/16" lug nuts are torqued to 90 ft/lbs but 80-85 ft/lbs would be okay. What is the range of your new torque wrench? 0-150 ft/lbs? What brand did you get?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
As far as I know all of the C3's 7/16" lug nuts are torqued to 90 ft/lbs but 80-85 ft/lbs would be okay. What is the range of your new torque wrench? 0-150 ft/lbs? What brand did you get?
its not big 10-75 pounds its a craftsman microtork 3/8 drive ( I figured to get the small one just cuz most things are 15-60 pounds, except lug-nuts)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
That's a good start. One day you can look forward to owning 4 of them. Add a 1/2" drive for up to 250lbs, an inch-pound, and a 10-75lb. beam style. Take care of it and it'll last forever- if it's a click type, dial it back to zero between uses so the springs don't take a "set".
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
256 Posts
That's a good start. One day you can look forward to owning 4 of them. Add a 1/2" drive for up to 250lbs, an inch-pound, and a 10-75lb. beam style. Take care of it and it'll last forever- if it's a click type, dial it back to zero between uses so the springs don't take a "set".
Great tip Tim, I didn't know about that, and have not done it. Is there something you can do if you have always just left it wherever the last setting was? It still seems to work fine, the most common thing i do is tighten lugs. I've had this thing for years.

Thanks!
T.Huck
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
584 Posts
Discussion Starter #7
That's a good start. One day you can look forward to owning 4 of them. Add a 1/2" drive for up to 250lbs, an inch-pound, and a 10-75lb. beam style. Take care of it and it'll last forever- if it's a click type, dial it back to zero between uses so the springs don't take a "set".
my cousin has bigger ones brand new snap-on ( at school they give it to them) and told me if I needed it to go pick it up
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
523 Posts
I found that out after sending my 1970 model Snap-On torque wrench to get calibrated. The calibration was not all that much in 1975, but the parts they had to replace were nearly the cost of a new one. Got a note from the cal shop about dialing it back to zero. Been doing that ever since and I've had it checked a couple of times. No more problems, other than having to replace the guts of the ratchet.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,563 Posts
I have the beam ones because they don't need to be turned back to zero
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,695 Posts
Torque Wrenches

Great tip Tim, I didn't know about that, and have not done it. Is there something you can do if you have always just left it wherever the last setting was? It still seems to work fine, the most common thing i do is tighten lugs. I've had this thing for years.

Thanks!
T.Huck

I have never "zeroed" my click-type torque wrenches after using them but then I have never stored them cranked all the way up their maximum setting. I have 5 of them altogether. A 1/4" drive 0-150 in/lb inch pound that is only 9" long, a 3/8" drive 0-350 inch pound that is about a foot long, a 3/8" drive 0-75 ft/lb that is about 18" long, an old 0-150 ft/lb beam type that is about 18" long, and a 0-250 ft/lb that is about 2 feet long. Why so many you may ask? Because there are places in which a standard length torque wrench won't fit so the shorter ones come in awfully handy.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,563 Posts
I believe in the manuals for the clickers it says to reset to zero
it's been years so I could be wrong , but I vaguely remember reading it

as far as having so many goes , you can never really have enough tools
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,197 Posts
I know the one I have in my home garage will snug them down but I have to go back with a lug wrench to torque by hand but at the shop the wrench there will put up to 120lbs. It has to do with the size of compressor I guess.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,563 Posts
I can't think of any wheels that need over 95lbs.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
81 Posts
In A&P school, we were taught to store them set at the lowest positive reading, on most wrenches this is 5. Don't know the reason. but in 40 years never had a torque wrench come back from cal that was off significantly.

vmo
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
5,563 Posts
after googling around.... some say lowest setting , some say store at 20% of max.....
I guess it pays to read the instruction manual
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
879 Posts
Great tip Tim, I didn't know about that, and have not done it. Is there something you can do if you have always just left it wherever the last setting was? It still seems to work fine, the most common thing i do is tighten lugs. I've had this thing for years.

Thanks!
T.Huck
Yea, you can send to be recalibrated but that is about as expensive as a new one! I bought two during the last few months of resto, a cheap one and one that actually works (LOL). I may have messed up the cheap one by not resetting it. I didn't know about that (who reads the instructions anyway?) until I got the better one. BTW, if you want to test it, come on over, I have more work that needs to be done (LOL).
 
1 - 18 of 18 Posts
Top