Chevy Corvette Forum banner

1 - 6 of 6 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,718 Posts
Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
I am now certain my right rear spindle's inner bearing surface has worn down so I'm going to pull it out tomorrow morning and see how much it has worn. I'm going to MIG weld it then turn it down to its original size. I have a 1950's 12" Craftsman lathe with all the needed accessories so it shouldn't be a very hard job. I'll post a pictures of it along the way.

I had been hearing an odd noise coming from my rear axle for the past year so this is most likely the source of that noise.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,718 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
I am now certain my right rear spindle's inner bearing surface has worn down so I'm going to pull it out tomorrow morning and see how much it has worn. I'm going to MIG weld it then turn it down to its original size. I have a 1950's 12" Craftsman lathe with all the needed accessories so it shouldn't be a very hard job. I'll post a pictures of it along the way.

I had been hearing an odd noise coming from my rear axle for the past year so this is most likely the source of that noise.
I got my spindle jerked out and its inner bearing surface diameter is .029" undersize. I have it cleaned and wrapped with masking tape to protect the good surfaces and I'll weld it after I rest for a while. Thankfully I have my 12" Craftsman lathe to turn it down to its original size after I weld it. I'll post pictures of the operation sometime tomorrow.
 

·
Smokin Vendor
Joined
·
19 Posts
I don't know if this is a good idea. For one when a spindle of anything is being repaired they are usually splatter welded and then turned or in this case ground. It would then go back through hardening depending on application, which in this application there is a hardening process that is done. As cheap as spindles are, it is not worth repairing the wrong way and it is too expensive to repair the correct way. When these break in the car, usually a car accident follows and you could hurt someone else if your wheel hits their car while traveling. All about saving money, but this is one of the parts that you make sure is correct.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,718 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
I don't know if this is a good idea. For one when a spindle of anything is being repaired they are usually splatter welded and then turned or in this case ground. It would then go back through hardening depending on application, which in this application there is a hardening process that is done. As cheap as spindles are, it is not worth repairing the wrong way and it is too expensive to repair the correct way. When these break in the car, usually a car accident follows and you could hurt someone else if your wheel hits their car while traveling. All about saving money, but this is one of the parts that you make sure is correct.
After welding it and turning/grinding/polishing it back to its original size I installed it and put about 100 miles on it. But then I decided to buy a new one because I was concerned about its strength being affected during the welding process. Here's the before and after pictures:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,718 Posts
Discussion Starter #5
I don't know if this is a good idea. For one when a spindle of anything is being repaired they are usually splatter welded and then turned or in this case ground. It would then go back through hardening depending on application, which in this application there is a hardening process that is done. As cheap as spindles are, it is not worth repairing the wrong way and it is too expensive to repair the correct way. When these break in the car, usually a car accident follows and you could hurt someone else if your wheel hits their car while traveling. All about saving money, but this is one of the parts that you make sure is correct.
I'm sure it's not a good Idea and I would never recommend anyone else doing it. As I was bored to tears during this lockdown I wanted to see if I could do it. After the welding process I put it into my lathe and quickly discovered the welded portion as almost as hard as tool steel. I burned up THREE three-sided carbide inserts when I machined it down to within a few thousands of the final size size. Then I ground it and polished it to the final size. The rest of it the spindle machined easily so the welding really affected its hardness. It was that hardness difference that made me decide to replace it because I feared the welded portion would create a stress riser. If it happened to break while I was driving it the caliper would prevent the broken part from escaping.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,718 Posts
Discussion Starter #6
I don't know if this is a good idea. For one when a spindle of anything is being repaired they are usually splatter welded and then turned or in this case ground. It would then go back through hardening depending on application, which in this application there is a hardening process that is done. As cheap as spindles are, it is not worth repairing the wrong way and it is too expensive to repair the correct way. When these break in the car, usually a car accident follows and you could hurt someone else if your wheel hits their car while traveling. All about saving money, but this is one of the parts that you make sure is correct.
Here's an interesting video showing how axle shafts are made:
But I don't think they are heat treated after the axle flange is formed. They are made from a very high carbon steel but yet they are easily machined.
 
1 - 6 of 6 Posts
Top