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Discussion Starter #1
What is the formula for each pound reduced equals what in sprung weight? I'm not 100% but 8lbs is sticking in my head.

Does anyone know?
 

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Not sure of the question.

Here is part of an article on unspung vs. sprung weight.

"Unsprung vs. sprung weight have no difference in their effect on acceleration or top speed. There is no “1-10” rule (or any other ratio) where 1 lb. removed from unsprung weight “has the same same effect as” a higher amount of sprung weight. Any benefit from weight reduction towards increased MPH or reduced ET will be exactly the same as if the weight were removed from the chassis. Weight removed from an unsprung component, such as a rear wheel or axle housing, may affect traction if the wheel is not under control during launch.
Lighter wheels & tires do have a very small additional benefit due to the lower amount of power required to rotate them (true of all rotating components), but this is not due to their classification as unsprung weight.
The unsprung vs. sprung weight percentage greatly affects wheel control, but its importance is almost entirely limited to un-even surfaces, or conditions where the attitude of the vehicle changes (such as through G forces). This is most important in off-road and pavement road racing, somewhat less important in dirt track, and has almost no value in drag racing."

Here is the whole article on this.

http://victorylibrary.com/mopar/sprung-c.htm
 

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What is the formula for each pound reduced equals what in sprung weight? I'm not 100% but 8lbs is sticking in my head.

Does anyone know?
I believe it's for every 1lb reduced does equal something like 8lbs sprung weight reduction.
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Not sure of the question.

Here is part of an article on unspung vs. sprung weight.

"Unsprung vs. sprung weight have no difference in their effect on acceleration or top speed. There is no “1-10” rule (or any other ratio) where 1 lb. removed from unsprung weight “has the same same effect as” a higher amount of sprung weight. Any benefit from weight reduction towards increased MPH or reduced ET will be exactly the same as if the weight were removed from the chassis. Weight removed from an unsprung component, such as a rear wheel or axle housing, may affect traction if the wheel is not under control during launch.
Lighter wheels & tires do have a very small additional benefit due to the lower amount of power required to rotate them (true of all rotating components), but this is not due to their classification as unsprung weight.
The unsprung vs. sprung weight percentage greatly affects wheel control, but its importance is almost entirely limited to un-even surfaces, or conditions where the attitude of the vehicle changes (such as through G forces). This is most important in off-road and pavement road racing, somewhat less important in dirt track, and has almost no value in drag racing."

Here is the whole article on this.

http://victorylibrary.com/mopar/sprung-c.htm
Thanks for posting. Good information :thumbsup::thumbsup:
 

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Not sure of the question.

Here is part of an article on unspung vs. sprung weight.

"Unsprung vs. sprung weight have no difference in their effect on acceleration or top speed. There is no “1-10” rule (or any other ratio) where 1 lb. removed from unsprung weight “has the same same effect as” a higher amount of sprung weight. Any benefit from weight reduction towards increased MPH or reduced ET will be exactly the same as if the weight were removed from the chassis. Weight removed from an unsprung component, such as a rear wheel or axle housing, may affect traction if the wheel is not under control during launch.
Lighter wheels & tires do have a very small additional benefit due to the lower amount of power required to rotate them (true of all rotating components), but this is not due to their classification as unsprung weight.
The unsprung vs. sprung weight percentage greatly affects wheel control, but its importance is almost entirely limited to un-even surfaces, or conditions where the attitude of the vehicle changes (such as through G forces). This is most important in off-road and pavement road racing, somewhat less important in dirt track, and has almost no value in drag racing."

Here is the whole article on this.

http://victorylibrary.com/mopar/sprung-c.htm
Always something interesting to read here. :coffeetime:
 
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