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I am about to replace the fuel pump in my '61 corvette. Although fairly handy I am not an experienced mechanic and am looking for advice with a couple of issues. The first - is there anyway to plug the flexible fuel line where it ports into the fuel pump. I know I should drain the fuel tank first but I filled it just before the pump died. (note: I haven't yet determined whether the fuel line is blocked between the tank and the pump.) I don't look forward to draining the gas tank with this much gasoline but it is what it is.

The second issue is related to the fuel pump and the push rod from the cam. I have read, "On the front side of the block, next to the fuel pump, you'll see two mounting holes. The upper hole is threaded all the way through the block into the cavity for the fuel pump push rod. Before removing the pump, thread a 3/8" bold in, lightly tightening the bold against the push rod. This will lock the push rod in place so that it does not drop when removing the fuel pump… After installing the new gasket and fuel pump, remove the temporary bolt, releasing the push rod to rest against the fuel pump rocker arm. Reinstall fittings and lines etc…"

I find this somewhat confusing and checked the shop manual. it urges caution when connecting the push rod to the rocker arm but says nothing about a bold etc. The shop manual suggests that care should be taken to make sure the push rod is positioned properly and to test it by feel before tightening up by having a helper crank the engine. If you feel no push rod action (vibration) then it is not positioned properly.

I suppose once I get the pump off the block I will have a better understanding of the "bolt option." Unfortunately, it looks like I will also have to drain the radiator and remove the lower hose in order to get the pump off. It doesn't help that I will be working on my back all the while as I do not have a lift.

I welcome any and all thoughts, insight, tips or whatever that might simplify this project - which, when I first looked at it thought it might be pretty straightforward.

Thanks for any help.
Larry
 

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I am about to replace the fuel pump in my '61 corvette. Although fairly handy I am not an experienced mechanic and am looking for advice with a couple of issues. The first - is there anyway to plug the flexible fuel line where it ports into the fuel pump. I know I should drain the fuel tank first but I filled it just before the pump died. (note: I haven't yet determined whether the fuel line is blocked between the tank and the pump.) I don't look forward to draining the gas tank with this much gasoline but it is what it is.

The second issue is related to the fuel pump and the push rod from the cam. I have read, "On the front side of the block, next to the fuel pump, you'll see two mounting holes. The upper hole is threaded all the way through the block into the cavity for the fuel pump push rod. Before removing the pump, thread a 3/8" bold in, lightly tightening the bold against the push rod. This will lock the push rod in place so that it does not drop when removing the fuel pump… After installing the new gasket and fuel pump, remove the temporary bolt, releasing the push rod to rest against the fuel pump rocker arm. Reinstall fittings and lines etc…"

I find this somewhat confusing and checked the shop manual. it urges caution when connecting the push rod to the rocker arm but says nothing about a bold etc. The shop manual suggests that care should be taken to make sure the push rod is positioned properly and to test it by feel before tightening up by having a helper crank the engine. If you feel no push rod action (vibration) then it is not positioned properly.

I suppose once I get the pump off the block I will have a better understanding of the "bolt option." Unfortunately, it looks like I will also have to drain the radiator and remove the lower hose in order to get the pump off. It doesn't help that I will be working on my back all the while as I do not have a lift.

I welcome any and all thoughts, insight, tips or whatever that might simplify this project - which, when I first looked at it thought it might be pretty straightforward.

Thanks for any help.
Larry

The old 265" and 283" engines used front motor mounts that attached to the front of the engine block. The TOP bolt hole on the right side is the hole they're referring to. It is threaded all the way through to the fuel pump push rod. By screwing a LONG 3/8" bolt into that upper hole, the bolt will go up against the push rod and hold it in place. But you have to make sure the push rod is UP in it's bore before you tighten the bolt. So that's why it can take two people. One to crank the engine over and one to check the position of the push rod. Once the push rod is UP, then you can snug up the bolt; holding the push rod from sliding down. Then you can easily bolt the new fuel pump on. Oh yeah, when you take the rubber hose off the fuel pump, shove a punch or a 3/8" bolt into the hose to keep it from leaking. Then after you get the new fuel pump bolted down, be sure to take that long bolt out and put the original 1/2" long bolt back in.
 

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The C1 main line-to-pump inlet arrangement is quite different than on '63-up Corvettes; the hose has a crimped-on female inverted flare fitting that mates with the male inverted flare fitting on the main line on the frame, and at the pump end, the hose has a crimped-on male tapered pipe thread fitting that threads into the female pipe thread fitting on the brass elbow at the pump inlet.

As a result, the hose has to be disconnected from the frame line fitting first, before it can be unscrewed from the elbow fitting at the pump; fuel flow must be stopped at the male fitting on the line on the frame, not by clamping the hose shut as on later cars.

I use a Weatherhead brass double-female inverted flare union with a male inverted flare plug in one end, and screw the open end onto the male fitting on the line on the frame to stop fuel flow (photo below). The other option is to drain the tank, but that's a major PITA.

If you turn the crankshaft so the timing index line on the balancer aligns with the "0" on the timing tab, the fuel pump pushrod will be fully retracted, on the base circle of the eccentric on the cam that drives it.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Ok... Gas tank drained, coolant drained (unnecessarily as it turned out), fuel line disconnected at frame, fuel pump removed. Push rod seems to be resting at bottom of cavity, could find no holes for any 3/8" bolt, moving on to the next phase: installation sometime next week.
Larry
 

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Here's a photo of the upper hole on the front of the block that has the short (1/2") shipping bolt in it that you remove and temporarily replace with a longer bolt to hold the pushrod in position. Be sure to remove the temporary (longer) bolt and replace it with the shorter bolt before you start the engine, or you'll damage the pushrod.
 

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Discussion Starter #7
JohnZ,
Thank You for the explanation. I now see what was being referred to. It is amazing that in the several articles and suggestions no one made it clear that I should remove the shipping stud to reveal the hole to be used. New fuel pump should be here in a few days. Thanks again.

Larry
 
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