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I just changed the rear shocks on my '86. The 3/4" socket seemed to fit, then I noticed I was starting to round the corners on the nut!! Turned out to me a 18mm metric. WTF???
 

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GM had it's fun didn't they

it's a hassle
you need metric and standard sockets
 

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Just use adjustable socket next time LOL
 

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There are some things that I never use: open end wrenches, crescent wrenches, adjustable sockets, but there are some things I love: vice grips and pipe wrenches HA, HA
 

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Don't forget hammers !
 

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There are some things that I never use: open end wrenches, crescent wrenches, adjustable sockets, but there are some things I love: vice grips and pipe wrenches HA, HA
That's sounds like me :) .

My new favorite tool are the ratcheting wrenches with the flex. I've been doing it the hard way until my wife got me a set for Christmas.
 

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I just bought some new toys.. An air ratchet and impact. haven't had the chance to play with them yet. :drool5:
I always use my Airtools for removal most of the time I install them by hand at least always start them by hand.

But air tools have made hard job do able many time over.
 

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"I always use my Airtools for removal most of the time I install them by hand at least always start them by hand."

Agree, I use air tools for disassembly whenever possible, cuts the time by 75%.
For assembly I always do things by hand because I torque everything to the proper values............
 

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"I always use my Airtools for removal most of the time I install them by hand at least always start them by hand."

Agree, I use air tools for disassembly whenever possible, cuts the time by 75%.
For assembly I always do things by hand because I torque everything to the proper values............
I must agree start all bolts and nuts by hand run them down by hand when you can.

Nothing beats a Good Tourqe Wrench to make sure things things are tight.

I try not to use to German tourqe way Good and tight or use the calibrated elbow.
 

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Metric and sae

I found and purchased 10 years ago a socket and wrench set called Metrench It's awesome t works on both metric and sae and is the best for a rounded or rusted part as it grips on the flats not the points. I use this set almost exclusively and let my snap-on stuff gather dust. I haven't broke anything including the ratchet. Check it out you can find them on eBay or google
 

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You can use American sockets on some metric fasteners and metric sockets on some American fasteners but it's always best to use the correct socket. When the metric fasteners first arrived in the U.S. I immediately bought a set of metric wrenches and sockets as I knew the metrics would eventually win. MY '82 uses metric fasteners in most every place except the engine.

For those of you who don't know what the metric thread pitch designations mean, here's how it goes: The metric system uses the number of threads per millimeter of length. As a millimeter is .040", a designation of 1.0 means there is one thread per every .040" of length. A designation of 1.25 means there is one thread per every 1.25 millimeters (or one thread per .050"). And a designation of 1.50 means there is one thread per every 1.5 millimeters (or one thread per .060" of length). And likewise a designation of a .75 means there is one thread per every .75 millimeter (or one thread per .030") and a designation of .50 means one thread per every .50 millimeter (or one thread per .020"). Much easier to understand than our "threads per inch" system as the metric system gives you the exact distance from one thread to the next thread.

Metric bolts can easily be identified as they don't have the 3, 5, or 6 "grade" markings on them as American bolts have. Just numbers. And even though 8mm and 5/16" bolts can somewhat interchange they're not really interchangeable as the thread pitches are several thousands of an inch difference and they will start to bind up as they are screwed in deeper and deeper. And if you ever have to clean up damaged spark plug hole threads, NEVER use a common tap of that same size. Only use special spark plug taps because spark plug taps are smaller in diameter than standard taps.
 

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I found and purchased 10 years ago a socket and wrench set called Metrench It's awesome t works on both metric and sae and is the best for a rounded or rusted part as it grips on the flats not the points. I use this set almost exclusively and let my snap-on stuff gather dust. I haven't broke anything including the ratchet. Check it out you can find them on eBay or google


they look like they work the same way flank drive / snap-on does
just looser
 
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