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When I removed my #3310 the morning after logging 60 miles on a 100 degree afternoon I discovered it was almost empty. The residual heat from the HOT engine, intake, and zinc carb had evaporated the gas. I knew gasoline would evaporate more in hot weather but I never realized how much more until I found it nearly empty. So if you have trouble starting your engine a few hours after a hot shut off it's probably because your carb is almost empty so it takes some cranking to refill it.
 

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When I removed my #3310 the morning after logging 60 miles on a 100 degree afternoon I discovered it was almost empty. The residual heat from the HOT engine, intake, and zinc carb had evaporated the gas. I knew gasoline would evaporate more in hot weather but I never realized how much more until I found it nearly empty. So if you have trouble starting your engine a few hours after a hot shut off it's probably because your carb is almost empty so it takes some cranking to refill it.
Are you describing a form of vapor lock? I've been having the opposite with my 79, after a good warming up, I get loaded up with richness, wants to stall when idling. After I start, lots of black blows out the back.
 

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Are you describing a form of vapor lock? I've been having the opposite with my 79, after a good warming up, I get loaded up with richness, wants to stall when idling. After I start, lots of black blows out the back.
I wasn't referring to vapor locking but vapor locking does occur after a HOT shut down. One of the signs of a failing fuel pump is stumbling at idle and the only way to know for sure is to check the fuel pressure which means installing a pressure tap somewhere between the pump and carburetor. Here's what I did on my '82:
 

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