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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
At first I wasn't going to do a frame off restoration. I guess I was just so eager to get the car in driving condition I didn't wanna put myself through that long of a wait. But after getting as far into this project as I already am, I would hate to look back on this opportunity and say "I should have done it then." I have one question. To my knowledge, They're are 8 bolts that hold the body to the frame, is it as simple as unbolting all 8, having a couple buddies of mine lift the body and just roll the frame out from the body and setting the body down? It just seems like it is going to have a lot more to it than that. It's a 79 and I have already pulled out the engine and tranny if that helps at all. Any and all advice will be appreciated guys, thanks in advanced.
 

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Get an "Assembly Instruction Manual" if you if you don't have one yet. Corvette Central sells them. Remove the front and rear bumpers. Disconnect any brake and fuel lines that attach the body and frame. Also, wire harnesses/ ground wires that would attach the body and frame. Here's the frame mounting points.

 

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and A/C or tie off the compressor and rad/ fan shroud ,trans cooling lines.etc. .. the bolts will likely be severely rusted.. if you cannot unbolt, you will need to cut them .. two are in the rear wheelwell, there is an access panel right behind driver door
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
WOW... mike I could not have asked for a better example, you hit the nail on the head for me, Thank you. I'm gonna order that manual right now. I'll be sure to take pictures and keep you guys updated.
 

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That frame is frickin awesome. I am jealous. All I did was paint mine. That thing looks bulletproof.
Thanks! I really like the Flame Red powdercoat, glad I did it. I figured all the trouble that I went through to pull the body off and the cleaning, grinding and welding, that it was worth the $900 I paid for acid dip and powdercoating it a color I like. When people look underneath the reaction that I usually get is "WOW!".
 

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Thanks! I really like the Flame Red powdercoat, glad I did it. I figured all the trouble that I went through to pull the body off and the cleaning, grinding and welding, that it was worth the $900 I paid for acid dip and powdercoating it a color I like. When people look underneath the reation that I usually get is "WOW!".
Gave me the WOW factor :thumbsup3:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I have a couple more things to clean out of the garage I am working in before I get started on this. I wanna make sure I have all the tools I need so there's no hiccups. I have a baby air compressor that ain't gonna cut it so I was wondering do any of you know what size air compressor I would need to do the sandblasting? I heard you need a water filter for the air compressor as well so the sand doesn't clog up in the gun. What's a good size compressor for this kind of job? any brand you would reccommend. Also anyone have a brand of sandblaster they have used that gave them good results? online they're a bunch and everyone has a good review but I'd rather hear from one of ya'll personal experiences.
 

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Sandblasters

I have a couple more things to clean out of the garage I am working in before I get started on this. I wanna make sure I have all the tools I need so there's no hiccups. I have a baby air compressor that ain't gonna cut it so I was wondering do any of you know what size air compressor I would need to do the sandblasting? I heard you need a water filter for the air compressor as well so the sand doesn't clog up in the gun. What's a good size compressor for this kind of job? any brand you would reccommend. Also anyone have a brand of sandblaster they have used that gave them good results? online they're a bunch and everyone has a good review but I'd rather hear from one of ya'll personal experiences.

I have been using a Harbor Freight sandblaster for the last 25 years and I love it. If I recall it only cost about $25 (at the time) and they have ceramic nozzles; meaning they can use ordinary river sand as opposed to glass beads. I buy river sand from my local True Value hardware store for only $4.50 for 50 lbs whereas a 50 lb bag of glass beads costs almost $45.

You don't need a water filter unless you're using your compressor to paint something and then if you ARE using it to paint you can use a second (dry) tank like all air-brake trucks use. The first tank catches the moisture whereas the second tank provides clean air. The secret to keeping the sand dry is to store the sandblaster indoors and up off the ground.

To keep up with a sandblaster you'll need AT LEAST a 5 horsepower motor and even then you'll have to pause now and then to allow the compressor to catch up. Note a true 5 horsepower motor needs about 25 amps of 240 volts. The so-called "5 horsepower" 120 volt compressors you find at Home Depot and Harbor Freight aren't really 5 horsepower as that's the "locked rotor" horsepower rating which translates to about 1-3/4 actual horsepower.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Hey toobroke, first off I heard you were in the hospital recently so thank goodness your replying to my thread I'm gonna guess your doing better. Anyway I was looking on harbor freights website and I saw 2 types of sandblasters. This one http://www.harborfreight.com/110-lb-pressurized-abrasive-blaster-69724.html and this one http://www.harborfreight.com/portable-abrasive-blaster-kit-37025.html. Which one would you say is a better choice? I got a 5hp 120psi 25gallon compressor today off Craigslist, I couldn't find a 5hp air compressor that was 240volt, so I had to get the 120 volt. It's not gonna be a problem is it? Thanks for replying and I hope your in good health
 

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Sandasters And Air Compressors

Hey toobroke, first off I heard you were in the hospital recently so thank goodness your replying to my thread I'm gonna guess your doing better. Anyway I was looking on harbor freights website and I saw 2 types of sandblasters. This one http://www.harborfreight.com/110-lb-pressurized-abrasive-blaster-69724.html and this one http://www.harborfreight.com/portable-abrasive-blaster-kit-37025.html. Which one would you say is a better choice? I got a 5hp 120psi 25gallon compressor today off Craigslist, I couldn't find a 5hp air compressor that was 240volt, so I had to get the 120 volt. It's not gonna be a problem is it? Thanks for replying and I hope your in good health

The main difference between the two sandblasters is their capacity. As either sand (real inexpensive) or glass beads (real expensive) comes in 50 pound sacks and it takes a LONG time to consume 50 pounds I'd recommend the cheaper one. By the way, glass beads leaves a shinier surface than sand does but costs about 10 times as much. As the Harbor Freight sandblasters can use ordinary river sand because they have ceramic nozzles I quit using glass beads a long time ago. Sandblasters made a long time ago used steel nozzles and those nozzles got destroyed by sand so the ceramic nozzles are mighty nice to have.

Now, the problem with the so-called "5 hp" compressors that run on 120 volts is they aren't 5 hp at all. They actually produce around 1-3/4 horsepower which is far short of a real 5 hp. I have seen 120 volt motors that will produce up to 3 hp but that's by using three run capacitors (those bulgy things that are bolted to the motor shell). The problem with a sandblaster is it uses a LOT of air so they'll easily outrun a Harbor Freight type 5 hp compressor. That just means you'll only be able to sandblast for a few minutes then have to wait a few minutes for the compressor to recharge to 120 psi.

A genuine 5 hp compressor will cost at least $750 to $800 and will usually have a two-stage compressor and heavy duty tank capable of 175 to 180 psi. For the average home user the cheaper compressors will usually be adequate but for any commercial shop the only way to go is with the expensive 5 hp versions as they'll keep up with just about any air tool.

My compressor is powered by a 5 hp Tecumseh gasoline engine and has a 30 gallon tank that is tied into an additional 20 gallon tank; giving me 50 gallons of volume. And even then I often have to wait a few minutes for it to catch up if I'm using a blow gun or other high volume air tool.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
The main difference between the two sandblasters is their capacity. As either sand (real inexpensive) or glass beads (real expensive) comes in 50 pound sacks and it takes a LONG time to consume 50 pounds I'd recommend the cheaper one. By the way, glass beads leaves a shinier surface than sand does but costs about 10 times as much. As the Harbor Freight sandblasters can use ordinary river sand because they have ceramic nozzles I quit using glass beads a long time ago. Sandblasters made a long time ago used steel nozzles and those nozzles got destroyed by sand so the ceramic nozzles are mighty nice to have.

Now, the problem with the so-called "5 hp" compressors that run on 120 volts is they aren't 5 hp at all. They actually produce around 1-3/4 horsepower which is far short of a real 5 hp. I have seen 120 volt motors that will produce up to 3 hp but that's by using three run capacitors (those bulgy things that are bolted to the motor shell). The problem with a sandblaster is it uses a LOT of air so they'll easily outrun a Harbor Freight type 5 hp compressor. That just means you'll only be able to sandblast for a few minutes then have to wait a few minutes for the compressor to recharge to 120 psi.

A genuine 5 hp compressor will cost at least $750 to $800 and will usually have a two-stage compressor and heavy duty tank capable of 175 to 180 psi. For the average home user the cheaper compressors will usually be adequate but for any commercial shop the only way to go is with the expensive 5 hp versions as they'll keep up with just about any air tool.

My compressor is powered by a 5 hp Tecumseh gasoline engine and has a 30 gallon tank that is tied into an additional 20 gallon tank; giving me 50 gallons of volume. And even then I often have to wait a few minutes for it to catch up if I'm using a blow gun or other high volume air tool.
so basically it will just take longer to sand blast, I'm used to waiting by now lol thanks for all your help too broke. I just got back from harbor freight they are out of stock of the sand blaster so I just ordered it from their website. Just a couple days before I start the frame off, I'll be sure to include pictures.
 
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