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Help me understand...why does hydro carbon get such a bad wrap.....I did an ultimate engine dress up kit and I think it looks great. What is the deal...
 

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Help me understand...why does hydro carbon get such a bad wrap.....I did an ultimate engine dress up kit and I think it looks great. What is the deal...
:useless:
 

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There are 3 styles.

Hydro Carbon
Carbon Fiber (lamination)
Solid Carbon fiber

Hydro Carbon - It’s a process that transfers selected ink patterns onto 3D or contoured surfaces. The film is placed on water and the high-molecular base begins to dissolve, a patented chemical activator is sprayed over it, causing the ink to remain floating in an oil like state on top of water. The part is then immersed into water and the upward pressure of the water causes the ink to wrap around and adhere to the part.

Process -
1. All parts are sanded down and smoothed out for any imperfections and are carefully inspected.
2. We then prime the products to be ready to go to the paint booth.
3. The next step is applying the PPG paint color of your choice or base color.
4. The next step is to dip the product in the imersion tank to apply the carbon fiber film pattern.
5. After the pattern is dry and baked on we then apply 3 coats of PPG clearcoat and polish to become a show stopping,deep, guaranteed long lasting finish.

Carbon Fiber (lamination)
From Wiki
Carbon fiber (carbon fibre), alternatively graphite fiber, carbon graphite or CF, is a material consisting of extremely thin fibers about 0.005–0.010 mm in diameter and composed mostly of carbon atoms. The carbon atoms are bonded together in microscopic crystals that are more or less aligned parallel to the long axis of the fiber. The crystal alignment makes the fiber very strong for its size. Several thousand carbon fibers are twisted together to form a yarn, which may be used by itself or woven into a fabric.[1] Carbon fiber has many different weave patterns and can be combined with a plastic resin and wound or molded to form composite materials such as carbon fiber reinforced plastic (also referenced as carbon fiber) to provide a high strength-to-weight ratio material. The density of carbon fiber is also considerably lower than the density of steel, making it ideal for applications requiring low weight.[2] The properties of carbon fiber such as high tensile strength, low weight, and low thermal expansion make it very popular in aerospace, civil engineering, military, and motorsports, along with other competition sports. However, it is relatively expensive when compared to similar materials such as fiberglass or plastic. Carbon fiber is very strong when stretched or bent, but weak when compressed or exposed to high shock (eg. a carbon fiber bar is extremely difficult to bend, but will crack easily if hit with a hammer).

Lamination meaning that a sheet of REAL carbon fiber is laid over top of a already pre-molded part (fiberglass, plastic) then resin etc is laid on top of it.

Not all Carbon Fiber (lamination) is the same. Some of it is made in China and some of those cheaper products use cheap resin which will turn colors and crack over time.

Hydrocarbon looks good and in inexpensive, but carbon fiber has a depth and 3D effect to it that just can't be achieved with anything else. Solid Carbon Fiber panels is what F1 uses along with other racing and aircraft use but are usually so expensive that the average car buyer would not pay for it but appears the same as the real carbon fiber (lamination).

As far as weight goes.

OEM Piece = x weight
Hydro Part = x plus the weight of paint
Carbon Fiber (Lamination) = x plus the carbon fiber materiel, resin, clear
Solid Carbon Fiber = a whole brand new part = less weight
 

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I love the look and am in the process of dressing up my engine bay. Here are pics of my FRC's. Next I'll be adding black carbon fiber hydrocarbon coolant and washer resevoirs, radiator cover, power duct and brake cover. I also want to add yellow silicone hoses. It's a work in progress!

Thanks for the explanation Gigity. :thumbsup3:



 

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Help me understand...why does hydro carbon get such a bad wrap.....I did an ultimate engine dress up kit and I think it looks great. What is the deal...
Are you asking why hydro-carbon wrap has a bad rap or why hydro-carbon wrap has a bad wrap. If the person who is doing it is not skilled, you might get a bad wrap and that would cause a bad rap but if the person is skilled, you might not get a bad rap about the wrap. Do you get my rap?:wtf:
 

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That should wrap up this post nicely.
 

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Help me understand...why does hydro carbon get such a bad wrap.....I did an ultimate engine dress up kit and I think it looks great. What is the deal...
It has a "bad wrap" because a lot of people think it is poser. On exotic vehicles carbon fiber is used because it is an extremely strong, lightweight material, making components that are much lighter than their metal counterparts. It is too expensive for regular production cars, so normally you'd only see it on very expensive, exotic cars. Hydro carbon gives you a carbon look a like appearence with none of the strength or weight benefits, making it power/tacky/whatever. Like putting Z06 badges on a base car for example.

I don't personally care: your car, do what makes you happy. But you asked why, and that's the reason.
 

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Most people who use hydro carbon parts aren't trying to pass it off as a genuine carbon fiber part. Most just like the look and pattern (myself included). IMO it looks great and it's just another option as opposed to painted, chrome, billet, etc.

Putting ZO6 badges on a base car... that's just plain deceptive, with the intent to mislead people.
 
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