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Will a dry sump system add more HP to a engine from one that doesn't have a dry sump system? I was reading a Corvette owners blog earlier that suggested dry sump will add HP?

Really?? How is that?
 

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If any it would be negligable - from reduction of windage. What the dry sump does is provides more oil at a constant supply under extreme (racing) conditions - no oil starvation.
 

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Will a dry sump system add more HP to a engine from one that doesn't have a dry sump system? I was reading a Corvette owners blog earlier that suggested dry sump will add HP?

Really?? How is that?
Not having oil in the pan reduces windage, freeing up horsepower. The gains can be substantial; for instance, on an engine dyno a very deep pan is usually run keeping all oil splash out of the crankshaft, and the engine picks up several % HP from that.
HOWEVER the oil pump that drives the dry sump system has several scavenging stages and thus places a lot of parasitic drag in the system. The added pump drag negates any gains the reduced windage would have.
Which is why the manual Grand Sports with a dry sump LS3 have the same SAE-Certified HP numbers as all other non dry sump LS3s, for example.
Maybe more oil = cooler temps = more power??
The engine is designed to run at a specific temperature range, around 196F. The oiling system does not change that. IF the engine really did run cooler, water condensate would not evaporate from the oil and you'd run into some very serious lubrication problems; that is why engine operating temps are designed to fall within a narrow range and then actively controlled within that range by the thermostat and the radiator fan; the oil temps trail the coolant temps so neither should change much between dry sump / wet sump.
 

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Not having oil in the pan reduces windage, freeing up horsepower. The gains can be substantial; for instance, on an engine dyno a very deep pan is usually run keeping all oil splash out of the crankshaft, and the engine picks up several % HP from that.
HOWEVER the oil pump that drives the dry sump system has several scavenging stages and thus places a lot of parasitic drag in the system. The added pump drag negates any gains the reduced windage would have.
Which is why the manual Grand Sports with a dry sump LS3 have the same SAE-Certified HP numbers as all other non dry sump LS3s, for example.


The engine is designed to run at a specific temperature range, around 196F. The oiling system does not change that. IF the engine really did run cooler, water condensate would not evaporate from the oil and you'd run into some very serious lubrication problems; that is why engine operating temps are designed to fall within a narrow range and then actively controlled within that range by the thermostat and the radiator fan; the oil temps trail the coolant temps so neither should change much between dry sump / wet sump.
Good information, although I'm surprised about the additional power from dry sump. :thumbsup3:
 

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Latest HotRod has article where they took a LS7 and changed it to WET sump. They GAINED hp. And yes, they were even surprised. I'm thinking that the gain/loss is within the margin of error of a dyno.
 

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Latest HotRod has article where they took a LS7 and changed it to WET sump. They GAINED hp. And yes, they were even surprised. I'm thinking that the gain/loss is within the margin of error of a dyno.
Very well could have been, how much power did they claim from the increase?
 

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If any it would be negligable - from reduction of windage. What the dry sump does is provides more oil at a constant supply under extreme (racing) conditions - no oil starvation.
:iagree::iagree: That and the oil is no longer full of air bubbles or foam. HP is negligable IMHO...
:thumbsup3::thumbsup3:
 

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After ALL the work involved.....

Dry sump max 514.7 'ft and 555.0 hp

Wet sump max 520.6 'ft and 554.4 hp

Like I said, well within margin of error for a dyno.
 

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Not having oil in the pan reduces windage, freeing up horsepower. The gains can be substantial; for instance, on an engine dyno a very deep pan is usually run keeping all oil splash out of the crankshaft, and the engine picks up several % HP from that.
HOWEVER the oil pump that drives the dry sump system has several scavenging stages and thus places a lot of parasitic drag in the system. The added pump drag negates any gains the reduced windage would have.
Which is why the manual Grand Sports with a dry sump LS3 have the same SAE-Certified HP numbers as all other non dry sump LS3s, for example.


The engine is designed to run at a specific temperature range, around 196F. The oiling system does not change that. IF the engine really did run cooler, water condensate would not evaporate from the oil and you'd run into some very serious lubrication problems; that is why engine operating temps are designed to fall within a narrow range and then actively controlled within that range by the thermostat and the radiator fan; the oil temps trail the coolant temps so neither should change much between dry sump / wet sump.
:goodpost::goodpost:
 

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If any it would be negligable - from reduction of windage. What the dry sump does is provides more oil at a constant supply under extreme (racing) conditions - no oil starvation.
thats what i read too :thumbsup:
 

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I read an article recently in an automobile magazine...Hot Rod, Super Chevy...can't remember the name.

They took a Z06 and converted the dry sump to wet sump. The dyno test confirmed and increase in HP. If I remember right about 6-HP.

I looked for the article but I guess I already passed it on. Showed the parts necessary for the conversion and a how to do explaination.

Interesting.
 

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I read an article recently in an automobile magazine...Hot Rod, Super Chevy...can't remember the name.

They took a Z06 and converted the dry sump to wet sump. The dyno test confirmed and increase in HP. If I remember right about 6-HP.

I looked for the article but I guess I already passed it on. Showed the parts necessary for the conversion and a how to do explaination.

Interesting.
6 HP is 6 HP. I'm thinking if you are adding this for the power you must have a car that is raced where you are squeezing out literally every pony you can find.
 
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