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Hello everyone,

I have an '87 that I think has the original paint. I have light swirls in the paint I'm looking to take out, so I bought a Porter Cable 7424XP and waiting for it to arrive. In the mean time, I'm researching polishes and waxes. In my research, the question came up, is the 87's paint single stage or dual stage. I'm honestly not sure what the difference is or how to tell for sure.

Does anyone here know what the car was painted with from the factory?

Thanks!
Mike
 

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If you are not sure whats on the car now, get a small piece of 1200 grit wetordry sandpaper.. lightly wet sand a very small area that you are going to buff any way.. if the water turns white ,its clearcoat or dual stage paint, if it turns red, [ I m assuming by picture] then it single stage.....to remove swirls you need a very light polish or swirl remover and a foam buffing pad...careful on the edges, its easy to burn thru the color
 

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If you are not sure whats on the car now, get a small piece of 1200 grit wetordry sandpaper.. lightly wet sand a very small area that you are going to buff any way.. if the water turns white ,its clearcoat or dual stage paint, if it turns red, [ I m assuming by picture] then it single stage.....to remove swirls you need a very light polish or swirl remover and a foam buffing pad...careful on the edges, its easy to burn thru the color

LOL... recommend taking sandpaper to tell if its single stage or base clear? Doesn't need to be all that.

A white or light colored microfiber towel and a mild polish is all you need. If you rub a clean area of the paint with the polish and get a color transfer you have single stage paint. If you don't then you have base/clear.

The process for detailing either is the same, I just recommend having an extra set of pads b/c the pigment you'll pull out of the single stage will clog the pads quickly.
 

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LOL! ...I spent 20 years in a body shop...its a simple and accurate way of determining if clearcoat is present..your polish on a cloth will show nothing if the paint is not oxidized...or he would have already seen red on his waxing cloth... and 1200 grit will leave such small sand scratches that the first pass with a buffer will remove them..not to mention if the existing paint has orange peel, 1200 grit, followed by 2000 grit, is a most effective way to remove prior to buffing...the end result will be a mirror like finish. and a foam pad will leave no more swirls...and buffing is not the same for single stage as is for dual..with single stage paints , too much buffing in upper panel areas can cause color distortions, especially true in metallic paints..whereas with clearcoat systems, you have a much greater amount of material that can be removed with no ill effects at all.
 

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Both recommendations will work to acertain single stage paint.

But for non-professionals I would recommend Dyan's method as a 'safer' option and one they would have to hand
 
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