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SmokinVette.com Forums : Corvette Forums : C6 Corvette Forums : C6 Corvette General Discussion : Difference between single disc and dual disc clutch?
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Old 11-25-2008, 06:35 AM   #1
Jack07C6
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Question Difference between single disc and dual disc clutch?

What is the difference between a single and dual disc clutch? My clutch is just about toast and I've been looking at different clutchs and came across terms like "single disc" and "dual disc", I understand the numeric difference from single to dual but what does this mean when talking about clutches?

I have no mods on my 2007 C6, will a dual disc last twice as long as single disc clutch?

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Old 11-26-2008, 06:03 AM   #2
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Much of the clutch discussion revolves around the inertia of the clutch, the torque capacity, the "feel" of the clutch, and the particular application.

Clutches are generally rated by their torque capacity. Single disk clutches will have less torque capacity based on their swept area than a dual or triple disk clutch.

The single disk can have either higher or lower inertia compared to a stock clutch depending on the design and torque capacity.

Dual or triple disk clutches are designed for lower inertia and higher torque as they spread the load out over more surfaces. Some are rated for drag racing (highly abusive to the friction material) and some are rated for road racing (lowest inertia for quick shifting). Dual & triple disk clutches tend to be noisier in comparison to their single disk counterparts as there are more plates and separators rotating especially around idle with the trans in neutral and the clutch engaged.

Single disk - good for all around peformance on a stock or mildly modified engine. Will have stock like engagement and shifting speed. Generally handles higher torque than the stock clutch.

Dual disks - designed to handle much higher torque than stock. Inertial forces should be lower than stock.

Flywheels: Often overlooked. Steel will give stock like engagement. Will dampen out idle pulsations more than their aluminum counterparts.

Aluminum is generally for road race/drag race only. Not as friendly on the street with aggressive camshafts as the low inertia can make the car a lot easier to stall.
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Old 11-26-2008, 06:14 AM   #3
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DynamicTuningSolutions View Post
Much of the clutch discussion revolves around the inertia of the clutch, the torque capacity, the "feel" of the clutch, and the particular application.

Clutches are generally rated by their torque capacity. Single disk clutches will have less torque capacity based on their swept area than a dual or triple disk clutch.

The single disk can have either higher or lower inertia compared to a stock clutch depending on the design and torque capacity.

Dual or triple disk clutches are designed for lower inertia and higher torque as they spread the load out over more surfaces. Some are rated for drag racing (highly abusive to the friction material) and some are rated for road racing (lowest inertia for quick shifting). Dual & triple disk clutches tend to be noisier in comparison to their single disk counterparts as there are more plates and separators rotating especially around idle with the trans in neutral and the clutch engaged.

Single disk - good for all around peformance on a stock or mildly modified engine. Will have stock like engagement and shifting speed. Generally handles higher torque than the stock clutch.

Dual disks - designed to handle much higher torque than stock. Inertial forces should be lower than stock.

Flywheels: Often overlooked. Steel will give stock like engagement. Will dampen out idle pulsations more than their aluminum counterparts.

Aluminum is generally for road race/drag race only. Not as friendly on the street with aggressive camshafts as the low inertia can make the car a lot easier to stall.
Nice write up guys
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Old 11-26-2008, 01:28 PM   #4
tom snitzer
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DynamicTuningSolutions View Post
Much of the clutch discussion revolves around the inertia of the clutch, the torque capacity, the "feel" of the clutch, and the particular application.

Clutches are generally rated by their torque capacity. Single disk clutches will have less torque capacity based on their swept area than a dual or triple disk clutch.

The single disk can have either higher or lower inertia compared to a stock clutch depending on the design and torque capacity.

Dual or triple disk clutches are designed for lower inertia and higher torque as they spread the load out over more surfaces. Some are rated for drag racing (highly abusive to the friction material) and some are rated for road racing (lowest inertia for quick shifting). Dual & triple disk clutches tend to be noisier in comparison to their single disk counterparts as there are more plates and separators rotating especially around idle with the trans in neutral and the clutch engaged.

Single disk - good for all around peformance on a stock or mildly modified engine. Will have stock like engagement and shifting speed. Generally handles higher torque than the stock clutch.

Dual disks - designed to handle much higher torque than stock. Inertial forces should be lower than stock.

Flywheels: Often overlooked. Steel will give stock like engagement. Will dampen out idle pulsations more than their aluminum counterparts.

Aluminum is generally for road race/drag race only. Not as friendly on the street with aggressive camshafts as the low inertia can make the car a lot easier to stall.
Good write up! My track RR car has a Tilton clutch. It has a very low inertial mass, but as described above is not something you want on the street.

It has a very quick engagement and is generally like a "on/off" switch in lower gears. Most folks who drive this type of clutch will stall the car at take off until they are used to the feel.

The great news is the engine throttles up very very fast. Super easy to blip on downshift.
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